The Narmer Catalog

Inscription Detail

0175 ((Narmer?) serekh from Rafiah(?))

Source No: 0175

Date: (Narmer?)

Dated by: typology

Type: inscription on vessel

Material: pottery

Region: Canaan

Site: Rafiah ( Sheikh Zumweid )

Locality:

Depository: The Israel Museum ( Jerusalem )

Registration No. 69.31.367

References

Amiran, 1970

pp. 88-94

p. 88, pl. 1; p. 93, pl. 2

Helck, 1987

p. 130

Kahl, 1994

p. 184, n. 175

van den Brink, 1996

pp. 141-144; p.156, n. 10

p. 142, table 1, I.3; p. 143, fig. 1, I.3

van den Brink, 2001

pp. 24-27

p. 24, fig. I.3; p. 27, fig. 1

van den Brink and Gophna, 2004

p. 487-506; p. 490, fig. 2.1

p. 490, fig. 2.1; p. 491, fig. 2.3

Regulski, Database of Early Dynastic Inscriptions

Comments

Despite the fact that its provenance is almost certainly not "Rafia", that continues to be the way it is referred to.
Although the jar was purchased from a dealer, Amiran , 1970 (p. 89, n.1) is "inclined to accept the dealer's information concerning the provenance of the jar (Rafiah)."
Amiran, 1970 dates the jar to very early in the 1st Dynasty, possibly Narmer. Van den Brink categorizes as Type I, which would be earlier than Narmer, and describes it as a "plain serekh".
Van den Brink and Gophna (2004) read the inscription as "anonymous", and date it to earlier than Narmer.
Kahl 1994 dates the serekh "(0. Dyn.)". Regulski dates it "Early Naqada III."
According to van den Brink (1996: p. 156, n. 10), quoting a personal communication from Ram Gophna, the site is actually Wadi el-Arish. However in van den Brink and Gophna (2004: p. 489), the site is listed as Sheikh Zumweid.

Editor's note: Helck 1987 includes Raphia in a list of sites in which the name of Narmer were found, but in a footnote he says "Hier auch einfache srh-Ritzungen" (Here also a simple serekh-incision). It seems most likely that the reading of Narmer's name was simply an error, rather than his intended interpretation.

It is very unlikely that this inscription dates to Narmer. An earlier date seems indicated.

0175 ((Narmer?) serekh from Rafiah(?))

van den Brink, 2001, p. 27, fig. 1

0175 ((Narmer?) serekh from Rafiah(?))

van den Brink, 1996, pl. 24c

More Images

van den Brink and Gophna, 2004, p. 490, fig. 2.1 (upper)

van den Brink and Gophna, 2004, p. 491, fig. 2.3


The Narmer Catalog

Inscription Detail

Source No:0175
Date:(Narmer?)
Dated by:typology
Type:inscription on vessel
Material:pottery
Region:Canaan
Site:Rafiah ( Sheikh Zumweid )
Locality:
Depository:The Israel Museum ( Jerusalem )
Registration No.69.31.367
References Discussion Figure/Plate
Amiran, 1970 pp. 88-94 p. 88, pl. 1; p. 93, pl. 2
Helck, 1987 p. 130
Kahl, 1994 p. 184, n. 175
van den Brink, 1996 pp. 141-144; p.156, n. 10 p. 142, table 1, I.3; p. 143, fig. 1, I.3
van den Brink, 2001 pp. 24-27 p. 24, fig. I.3; p. 27, fig. 1
van den Brink and Gophna, 2004 p. 487-506; p. 490, fig. 2.1 p. 490, fig. 2.1; p. 491, fig. 2.3
Regulski, Database of Early Dynastic Inscriptions

Comments: Despite the fact that its provenance is almost certainly not "Rafia", that continues to be the way it is referred to. Although the jar was purchased from a dealer, Amiran , 1970 (p. 89, n.1) is "inclined to accept the dealer's information concerning the provenance of the jar (Rafiah)." Amiran, 1970 dates the jar to very early in the 1st Dynasty, possibly Narmer. Van den Brink categorizes as Type I, which would be earlier than Narmer, and describes it as a "plain serekh". Van den Brink and Gophna (2004) read the inscription as "anonymous", and date it to earlier than Narmer. Kahl 1994 dates the serekh "(0. Dyn.)". Regulski dates it "Early Naqada III." According to van den Brink (1996: p. 156, n. 10), quoting a personal communication from Ram Gophna, the site is actually Wadi el-Arish. However in van den Brink and Gophna (2004: p. 489), the site is listed as Sheikh Zumweid. Editor's note: Helck 1987 includes Raphia in a list of sites in which the name of Narmer were found, but in a footnote he says "Hier auch einfache srh-Ritzungen" (Here also a simple serekh-incision). It seems most likely that the reading of Narmer's name was simply an error, rather than his intended interpretation. It is very unlikely that this inscription dates to Narmer. An earlier date seems indicated.


Images

0175 ((Narmer?) serekh from Rafiah(?))

van den Brink, 2001, p. 27, fig. 1

0175 ((Narmer?) serekh from Rafiah(?))

van den Brink, 1996, pl. 24c

0175 ((Narmer?) serekh from Rafiah(?))

van den Brink and Gophna, 2004, p. 490, fig. 2.1 (upper)

0175 ((Narmer?) serekh from Rafiah(?))

van den Brink and Gophna, 2004, p. 491, fig. 2.3

Inscription not found

Ok